Jeremy Goldstein serves cellular companies on issues of monetary legality

Corporations struggle so hard to create a sustainable economic environment in spite of the fact that the transition has faced a myriad of challenges. As witnessed by Jeremy Goldstein who is an attorney practicing in the city of New York, the situation has a wide range of outcomes. More so, the incentives for employees and investors stand to lose. The experience that Jeremy obtained as he served in various leading organizations in the country such as Verizon, Goldman Sachs as well as Bank of America among others offered him the skills and expertise to provide advice on handling Earnings per Share (EPS). Also, he dealt with many other incentive-based programs in addition to providing awareness debate over the use of performance-based programs. Learn more: https://nycinquirer.com/2018/01/15/nyc-lawyer-jeremy-goldstein-recommends-compromise-for-employment-incentives/

 

Earning per share is a good thing for not only employee incentives but also to the shareholders. It is one of the most significant determinants of the stock prices thus influencing shareholders on making critical decisions about buying or selling of their shares. More importantly is that the program offers incentives firms to raise the amount that they pay per employee.

 

A recent study carried out by a team of seasoned analysts confirmed that including EPS in the overall pay structure at an organization has proved to increase the level of success of a company. Although one may quickly conclude that EPS has no challenges when included in a business strategy, the competitive nature of shares, as well as trading, can sometimes allow entities to pull EPS to a partial advantage.

 

The use EPS within a company can not only lead to favoritism, but also blind eyes turned to Chief Executive Officers of companies as pointed out by opponents of the program. They have a firm belief that the metrics do not provide collective control since it permits executives to access excessive power over whether or not the EPS metrics are being met. It can also affect shareholders since the top leadership could be skewing metric results to drive share sales- something believed to be misleading and illegal. Jeremy Goldstein recommended a way of holding executives and CEOS account for their actions instead of doing away with EPS.

 

As a New York University School of Law student, Jeremy Goldstein practiced in the city for many years before branching off to set up his practice referred to as Jeremy Goldstein and Associates, LLC. He partnered with many cellular firms, oil and petroleum companies on matters of financial compensation and legality.

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